Working with an

e-raffle supplier

E-raffle supplier are an integral part of the process. The provide technology advice and support to charities conduct e-raffles with their equipment. In this section you’ll be able to read about what suppliers do and don’t do, how suppliers get paid, and where you can find a supplier to work with.

Information on suppliers...

What suppliers do and don’t do

 

Here are the key things a supplier can provide:

  • Advice on how to make your e-raffle as successful as possible

  • The technology (software solutions and hardware) for in-person e-raffles

  • Other equipment that you might be interested in using, such as display screens that show the jackpot total and selling kiosks

  • The “back office” web-based servers and applications for online e-raffles, including email addresses

  • Tools to customize ticket and website graphics and messages

  • The ability for you to accept electronic payment through a third-party e-payment provider

  • Training for your volunteers and staff on how to use the equipment

  • On-call support to deal with technical issues

  • Assistance with reports

 

Here are some things a supplier cannot do or provide:

  • Staff to sell tickets for you – either through the website or handheld units – charity staff and volunteers have to do this as part of conducting and managing the e-raffle

  • Decisions about pricing, ticket configuration, duration of the e-raffle, and sales locations

  • Marketing services (although your charity can contract with a separate marketing firm or service)

  • Preparing and submitting reports to the AGCO

  • Taking care of/securing the e-raffle equipment when you’re not using it

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How suppliers get paid

 

The AGCO requires that supplier fees be:

  • Reasonable

  • Directly related to the conduct and management of the e-raffle.

  • Be flat in structure (not a percentage)

 

For in-person e-raffles, the most common way suppliers get paid is to charge a flat amount for each paper receipt or issued, regardless of how many entries that paper receipt contains. For example:

  • If a customer were to purchase one entry into the draw, a single paper receipt would be issued.  The supplier would get a flat fee for that paper receipt. 

  • If a customer were to purchase 20 entries, a single paper receipt would still be issued (listing all 20 entry numbers) and the supplier would get the same flat fee for that one paper receipt.

 

Online e-raffles use a similar approach – the supplier receives a flat fee for each online transaction or sale – again, regardless of how many entries the customer has purchased at one time.

 

Electronic payment options (credit and debit) may be provided through third-parties (e.g. financial institutions) and are typically subject to additional fees.  Extra equipment such as on-site display screens or kiosk may also involve additional fees. 

 

Where you can find a supplier

 

The AGCO maintains a list of registered e-raffle suppliers and the solutions they have been approved to offer in Ontario.